Upgrades set if Hindmarsh win World cup bid

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Hindmarsh Stadium will receive more than $3 million worth of improvements, including 3500 temporary seats, should the Australia-New Zealand 2023 Women’s World Cup bid succeed.

But the upgrades, which extend to new hospitality and media facilities, will leave no lasting legacy at the home of SA soccer after it hosts proposed group games and a round-of-16 clash.

Football Federation Australia announced last week it had teamed up with New Zealand Football in a joint push to stage the first 32-nation World Cup.

The bid book submitted to FIFA listed Hindmarsh as one of 13 venues earmarked for an unspecified number of matches during the July 10-August 23 tournament.

A State Government spokesperson said temporary stands, similar to those installed during the Sydney 2000 Olympics, would raise the ground’s seating capacity to 18,435.

Matildas star Sam Kerr in action at Hindmarsh Stadium, which has been earmarked to host games in the 2023 Women’s World Cup bid. Picture: AAP Image/James Elsby
Matildas star Sam Kerr in action at Hindmarsh Stadium, which has been earmarked to host games in the 2023 Women’s World Cup bid. Picture: AAP Image/James Elsby

An FFA spokesman said media benches, VIP areas, outdoor hospitality zones, and volunteer and ticketing centres would also be erected at the stadium to meet FIFA standards.

But both confirmed permanent improvements, such as roofs over the ground’s three exposed sides, had not been factored into the $3.2 million upgrades.

Adding to the ground’s two changerooms would also not be required, given double-header fixtures were not planned.

“Hindmarsh stadium provides the opportunity to play the FWWC in a boutique, rectangular venue,” the FFA spokesman said.

“Permanent upgrades were discussed, however the venue footprint is very tight and therefore limits the ability to expand the venue.”

Sydney 2000 Olympics press manager Jenny Turner at Hindmarsh Stadium, with a section of the temporary seating installed during the Games in the background.
Sydney 2000 Olympics press manager Jenny Turner at Hindmarsh Stadium, with a section of the temporary seating installed during the Games in the background.

The temporary work would be funded from the overall event budget, backed by “significant financial support” from governments in both countries, according to the bid book.

Source, Images & More: https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/

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